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Turntables (and more) at High End Munich 2019

The days are over of aimlessly wandering around the MOC searching for turntables and other analog accouterments. This almost two hour video covers just what I saw on opening day (press day) at High End Munich 2019.

Among the highlights was the costly “state of the art” TechDAS Zero turntable (if you have to ask the price you can’t afford it) and at about an hour in, the radical new Wilson-Benesch GMT ONE System turntable (price TBA). Also introduced at the show was the circa $4000 Vertere DG-1 ‘table/arm combo from a company best known for it’s costly products.

In the video you will see Sculpture A cartridges A.3 and A.4, the insides of which are based on the venerable Denon DL-103. I didn’t know what these were when I shot the video and no one was around to tell me.

You’ll see many new turntable brands that all have interesting designs including the Pre-Audio ‘tables from Poland with built in micro-compressors for their air-bearing tone arms and the Takumi TT Level 2.1 from Holland that packs a great deal of quality into a reasonably priced package.

This is just day one’s coverage and there’s way more to come!

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Buddy Rich | Caravan

Welcome to MUSIC CIRCLE

Rare Footage of Harry James Orchestra , featuring Buddy Rich “Caravan”

Bernard “Buddy” Rich (September 30, 1917 – April 2, 1987) was an American jazz drummer and bandleader. Widely considered one of the most influential drummers of all time and known for his virtuoso technique, power, and speed, Rich was billed as “the world’s greatest drummer” during his career. He performed with many bandleaders, most notably Tommy Dorsey, Harry James, Count Basie, and led his own big band.

My Way – Drummer Steals The Show

Forget about the attractive female singer. All eyes on the drummer!

My Shining Hour

Gail Wynters (v), Chuck Marohnic (p), Tim Whalen (s), Chris Fitzgerald (b), Jason (d) perform this tune at my jazz event in 2007.

Artists Who Changed Music: Django Reinhardt

Special thanks to Paul Tingen for the research!

Django Reinhard has been called “the greatest guitarist who ever lived.” During his heyday, the 1930s and 40s, Reinhardt came up with solo and harmonic innovations on the guitar that had a big impact on modern jazz, blues, country, and rock guitar styles.

Together with violinist Stephane Grappelli, Reinhardt came up with a new, European style of jazz, called gypsy jazz, or manouche jazz—by fusing Dixieland, swing jazz, French traditional music, gypsy music, and more. He was the first to pioneer a form of jazz that centered around the guitar, in sharp contrast to American jazz, which was based around horns, drums and piano.

As if the above accomplishments were not amazing enough, Reinhardt achieved them while having to overcome obstacles that would have been insurmountable to pretty much anyone else. He was born a gypsy, or Romani, as they call themselves, and had to overcome extreme poverty, illiteracy, and anti-Romani prejudice and persecution.

On top of all this, there’s the truly mindboggling fact that Reinhardt was a virtuoso guitar player with severely crippled left-hand ring and little fingers. Half his body, including his left hand, was badly damaged in a fire when he was 18, at a point when he was just beginning to gain international fame as a banjo-guitar player. One leg was so badly burned, doctors wanted to amputate, and they also said he’d never play again.

Reinhardt insisted on keeping his leg, and his playing skills. With great determination he invented a new way of playing the guitar, performing virtuoso solos with just his index and middle fingers. If the video clips did not exist of him playing extremely fast runs up and down the fretboard with two fingers, people would forever doubt the veracity of the two-finger story.

Reinhardt’s amazing re-invention of himself as a guitarist has inspired countless musicians facing physical challenges. Most famously, in 1965, Tony Iommi lost the tips of his middle and ring fingers in an industrial accident. Like Reinhardt, he was told he’d never play again. When Iommi’s factory foreman played him a recording of Reinhardt, and explained that the lightning-fast runs were executed with just two fingers, 17-year old Iommi decided to start playing again.

Without Django Reinhardt, jazz and rock guitar, as well as European jazz in general, would today sound very different. Spiritually, he’s also one of the ancestors of heavy metal, for without Reinhardt, there would have been no Black Sabbath.

Artists Who Changed Music: Charlie Christian

Charlie Christian was to jazz what Jimi Hendrix was to rock. Both guitarists were at the forefront of a new musical genre, came up with a revolutionary approach to playing their instrument, and ended up becoming the benchmark for generations of guitarists after them. One could say that Hendrix was the ultimate electric guitar hero, and Charlie Christian the first electric guitar hero.

During his extremely brief tenure at the top, Christian did not only lay many of the foundations of the electric solo guitar in jazz, but also of bebop and cool jazz, the two new jazz directions in the early forties. He influenced literally all jazz guitarists that came after him, as well as legendary bebop and cool jazz musicians like Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie and Miles Davis.

On top, Christian became a huge influence on electric guitar soloists in general, also outside of jazz, including T-Bone Walker Eddie Cochran, Scotty Moore, B.B. King, Chuck Berry, Vernon Reid, Santana, and… Jimi Hendrix. It’s why Christian was in 1990 inducted in the Rock ’n’ Roll Hall of Fame, as an Early Influencer.

PAVING THE WAY

Charlie Christian had been active as one of the world’s leading musicians for less than two years. Yet his legacy lasts to this day. There are very few musicians, if any, who had such a great impact in such a short time.

Christian developed the jazz guitar further than them, in part influenced by horn players like saxophonist Lester Young. Another influence was the rowdy Western Swing music from his native Texas and Oklahoma, which fused jazz, blues, and local roots music, and often used violins and guitars. The influence of this style can be heard in Christian’s strong sense of groove, with his rhythm and solo playing often sounding almost funky.

He also used blues licks and double stops, and the way he played over the swing rhythm, which is a precursor to the rock ‘n roll shuffle, meant that his playing resonated with rock guitarists. Sometimes he’d crunch into his solos with a bite in his tone and an attack that predates the electric blues and rock ‘n roll of decades later.

Christian’s sense of phrasing was innovative in the way he spaced his notes and riffs across the beat, and across bars, often emphasizing off-beats. He also experimented with harmonic innovations like altered chords which he often played as arpeggios, and he tended to emphasize sixths and ninths. He also frequently used chromatic notes.

All these elements were crucial influences on bebop, and the jazz that came after it. Christian influenced jazz musicians in general, and pretty much all rock lead guitarists also owe a debt to him. As the world’s first guitar hero, Christian paved the way for generations of guitar heroes to come.

Artists That Changed Music: Wes Montgomery

Wes Montgomery is regarded one of the three founding fathers of the jazz guitar, the other two being Charlie Christian and Django Reinhardt.

Montgomery changed the world of music with his hitchhiker’s thumb, impossible guitar techniques, and sumptuous musical talent. He recorded 20 albums as a leader, many of them best-sellers, and won many readers’ and critics’ polls, as well as three Grammy Nominations and two Grammy Awards.

Montgomery achieved all this in less than 10 years after his breakthrough at the age of 36, because in another example of the tragically short, meteoric career of many jazz greats, he died in 1968, aged just 45.

Wes Montgomery lived in Indianapolis almost his entire life, and also died there. On the morning of June 15, 1968, he woke up in his house with chest pains, and soon afterwards collapsed of a heart attack. He was pronounced dead at the local hospital at 10:40am.

Wes Montgomery’s spirit has also been kept alive by his recordings, which today include a large amount of posthumous releases. Moreover, a new documentary about him, working title Wes Bound is being made end scheduled for release in 2023.

But most of all Montgomery’s spirit remains alive in the countless players who are influenced by him. Joe Pass once said, “To me, there have been only three real innovators on the guitar—Wes Montgomery, Charlie Christian, and Django Reinhardt.” And the great John Scofield once remarked, “I tried to copy Wes Montgomery, but it was too hard.”

Just a few of the countless jazz guitarists who have referenced Montgomery include George Benson, Martin Taylor, John Etheridge, Pat Metheny, Larry Coryell, Jim Mullen, and Lee Ritenour. The latter released an album called “Wes Bound” in 1993 and called his son Wesley. Montgomery also has been name-checked by rock and blues players like Jimi Hendrix, Eric Johnson, Steve Vai, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Joe Satriani, Steve Howe, Joe Bonamassa, and many, many others.

Wes Montgomery – Here’s That Rainy Day – Live London 1965

Stan Tracey (piano) Wes Montgomery (guitar) Rick Laird (bass) Jackie Dougan (drums) Television broadcast, “Tempo,” ABC TV, London, England, May 7, 1965

Canadian Freddie Stone with/without American Eddie “Duke” Ellington, enjoy 🙂

Fred Stone was born in Toronto Canada – a wonderful trumpet and flugelhorn player, composer and wit. He toured with Duke 70-71 and this clip is from a gig in Italy. Duke said when asked about Fred “I don’t know what he’s doing but he sure does it well.” We all love and miss Freddie!

“Maiera” composed by Fred Stone. Solos by Fred Stone and Norris Turney.

Cat Anderson, Mercer Ellington, Cootie Williams, Fred Stone, Nelson Williams, t; Booty Wood, Malcolm Taylor, tb; Chuck Connors, btb; Norris Turney, as; Russell Procope, as, cl; Paul Gonsalves, ts; Harold Ashby, ts, cl; Harry Carney, bs; Duke Ellington, p; Joe Benjamin, b; Rufus Jones, d.

Duke Ellington recording session, Studio Fontana in Milan – Italy
July 23, 1970

Jimmy Dale Orchestra from a CBC TV show Sept 9, 1965
Trumpets – Arnie Chycoski, Guido Basso (left), Fred Stone (right), Bob Van Evera
Trombones – Ron Collier, Rob McConnell, Butch Watanabe
Saxes – Bernie Piltch, Jack Taylor
Guitar – Ed Bickert
Piano/Arranger – Jimmy Dale
Drums – Andy Cree
Bass – Ian Henstridge

from the compilation “Ready Or Not – Deep Jazz Grooves From The CBC Radio Canada Archive 1967-1977” (2005), Do Right! Music.
Originally from “The Music Of Fred Stone / Le Musique De Fred Stone,” Radio Canada International.

Fred Stone – flugelhorn ;
Cathy Moses – flute ;
Bernie Senesky – piano ;
Lenny Boyd – bass ;
Pete Magadini – drums ;
Mike Craden – percussion.

Written by Michel Legrand.
Arranged by Fred Stone.
Recorded in Montreal October 12 & 13, 1972.
Recording engineer: Gilles Vaudeville.
Produced by Ted Farrant.

+++ plus +++

Second Line by Duke Ellington from his New Orleans Suite

Duke Ellington alla Bussola, locale notturno sul lungomare di Marina di Pietrasanta, presso la località Le Focette (Italy) nel 1970.

1969/11/1, Salle Pleyel, ORTF-TV “Newport a Paris” 2nd concert, Duke Ellington (p) & his Orch.: Cat Anderson, Cootie Williams, Mercer Ellington, Ambrose Jackson, Harold “Money” Johnson (t) Francois Guin, Lawrence Brown, Chuck Connors (tb) Russell Procope (as,cl) Johnny Hodges (as) Norris Turney (as,ts,cl,fl) Harold Ashby (ts,cl) Paul Gonsalves (ts) Harry Carney (bar,cl,b-cl) Victor Gaskin (b) Rufus Jones (d) Georgder Wein (m.c): added Don Byas (ts) Archie Shepp (ts): 9:42 Diminuendo & Crescendo In Blue / 4:45 from 6:16 C Jam Blues /
I hope the copyright-holders will tolerate these two exemplary clips for non commercial historical jazz research showing two featured important jazz-saxists by Duke´s orch.- a treasury, Unfortunately from those Duke concert 66/7/29 feat.Ben Webster on In A Mellow Tone & Just Squeeze Me – I own only an audio-tape and I don´t know the demand for an upload with dark screen..

1969/11/1, Salle Pleyel, ORTF-TV “Newport a Paris” 2nd concert, Duke Ellington (p) & his Orch.: Cat Anderson, Cootie Williams, Mercer Ellington, Ambrose Jackson, Harold “Money” Johnson (t) Francois Guin, Lawrence Brown, Chuck Connors (tb) Russell Procope (as,cl) Johnny Hodges (as) Norris Turney (as,ts,cl,fl) Harold Ashby (ts,cl) Paul Gonsalves (ts) Harry Carney (bar,cl,b-cl) Victor Gaskin (b) Rufus Jones (d) Georgder Wein (m.c): added Don Byas (ts) Archie Shepp (ts): 9:42 Diminuendo & Crescendo In Blue / 4:45 from 6:16 C Jam Blues /
I hope the copyright-holders will tolerate these two exemplary clips for non commercial historical jazz research showing two featured important jazz-saxists by Duke´s orch.- a treasury, Unfortunately from those Duke concert 66/7/29 feat.Ben Webster on In A Mellow Tone & Just Squeeze Me – I own only an audio-tape and I don´t know the demand for an upload with dark screen..

Fran Jeffries, “It Had Better Be Tonight”

Baby got real back – She’s got the best butt in the 1960s!!! Fran Jeffries can really rock!!!

Howard Roberts : All The Things You Are – 1950s & Wave – 1960s + The New Classic Singers : Guantanamera

Dinah Washington – Destination Moon

This is a very cool trailer from the HBO series “From the Earth to the Moon” with the great Dinah Washington singing the song “Destination Moon” as the background music.

Jeanne Moreau – Miles Davis – Louis Malle – Paris – 1958

Gene Harris Quartett Johnny Griffin All The Things You Are

Venus sang a song to NASA’s solar probe – listen to it right here

NASA’s description reads as follows:

“The data sonification in the video translates data from Parker Solar Probe’s FIELDS instrument into sound. FIELDS detected a natural, low-frequency radio emission as it moved through Venus’ atmosphere that helped scientists calculate the thickness of the planet’s electrically charged upper atmosphere, called the ionosphere. Understanding how Venus’ ionosphere changes will help researchers determine how Venus, once so similar to Earth, became the world of scorching, toxic air it is today.”

Pretty cool, huh?

My Source