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Century-old sunken ship preserved in perfect condition beneath Lake Superior

In August 1911, the luxury yacht Gunilda, owned by millionaire William Harkness, sank in 260′ of water after striking McGarvey Shoal in Lake Superior. In this video, we’ll begin at the bow of vessel and swim aft past the ship’s bell, across the deck, up one level to the searchlight, past a compass binnacle, up one more level to the fly bridge with wheel and telegraph. We’ll continue aft over the top of the ship, going past engine room skylights and then dropping down to deck level at the stern to see the aft steering station. Turning around, we’ll go back to the bow staying at deck level and swimming along the port side of the ship. We’ll pass (and peek into) the aft lounge, butler’s pantry, galley, and chart room. We’ll finish up by swimming past the bell again and on to the ascent line.

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These stunning images reveal the remains of a more than century-old sunken ship that has been preserved beneath freezing Lake Superior. The ship looks almost exactly the same as it did the day it sunk beneath waves all those years ago.

At 60 meters long (approximately 198 feet), the Gunilda sunk after it struck some rocks and was not saved. Now, these stunning images have been captured 107 years after the sinking when a small group of divers revisited the vessel. (Caters News)

These stunning images reveal the remains of a more than century-old sunken ship that has been preserved beneath freezing Lake Superior. (Photo: Becky Kagan Schott/Caters News)

The ship looks almost exactly the same as it did the day it sunk beneath the waves in 1911. (Photo: Becky Kagan Schott/Caters News)

At 60 meters long and built in Leith, Scotland, in 1897, the Gunilda sunk after it struck some rocks and could not be saved. (Photo: Becky Kagan Schott/Caters News)

Now, these stunning images have been captured 107 years after the sinking, when a small group of divers revisited the vessel. (Photo: Becky Kagan Schott/Caters News)

Becky Kagan Schott and her team dived an incredible 270 feet deep to reach the Gunilda and photograph her remains. (Photo: Becky Kagan Schott/Caters News)

Schott, a professional underwater photographer, camera operator, and technical diving instructor, says that the dangerous dive was something that they had planned for carefully. (Photo: Becky Kagan Schott/Caters News)

The Philadelphia adventurer had only 25 dives with the ship and she talks of how haunting the experience was. (Photo: Becky Kagan Schott/Caters News)

Not many divers visit the Gunilda, due to its remote location, depths of 270 feet, and chilly (38 degrees F/3 degrees C) temperatures. (Photo: Becky Kagan Schott/Caters News)

Schott, 35, said: “Visiting it was really like going back in time and it had a very haunting feel to it.”(Photo: Becky Kagan Schott/Caters News)

“I’ve never seen anything like it in all my years of shipwreck diving. For me it was almost surreal being there. I’d dreamed of seeing this shipwreck and it took years of experience both in diving and photography to be able to safely capture the images I saw in my mind.” (Photo: Becky Kagan Schott/Caters News)

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