The Last of Us [Murder at The Dakota]

72094a70-d7ed-11e4-9748-3fd77e204473_8409531487_c93dacf41f_kConsidered Manhattan’s most exclusive building, the Dakota is a co-op built in 1884 on the corner of 72nd Street and Central Park West on the Upper West Side. John Lennon was murdered outside in 1980, and his widow, Yoko Ono, still lives in their apartment. The building was also the setting for Roman Polanski’s classic 1968 creeper, “Rosemary’s Baby.”

The perfect setting for an old-fashioned, “dead body in a locked room” whodunit.

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The Endless Night, The First 16 Pages – [an excerpt from IUP, Book 01]

Poisen Elves
Be careful what you wish for … sometimes you get it

Click on the image of Jenny Miller, Mondo’s BFF, to read the pages … Enjoy … :)

 

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China’s “ghost cities”: a fever of destruction, construction, and abandonment [26/29]

Ghost City In Yunnan

Photo shows a gymnasium at Chenggong University City on November 22, 2013 in Chenggong, Yunnan Province of China. Chenggong is a satellite city located just south of Kunming. As of 2012, much of the newly constructed housing in Chenggong is still unoccupied, and it is reportedly one of the largest ghost towns in Asia. According to a China Youth Daily report in July, at least 12 such ghost cities across the country have been found. Besides the best known of these – Ordos in North China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, the list also included Changzhou in Jiangsu, Zhengdong New Area in Henan Province, Shiyan in Hubei and Chenggong District of Kunming in Yunnan.  (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)

***

Overzealous construction in China has left the country with a large number of empty developments clinging to the outskirts of major cities — a problem that some real estate developers have sought to solve with a bizarre side industry in the rental of Westerners to glamorize the areas and attract visitors. Click here for a short video report on the rent-a-foreigner industry, and click through this slideshow to see some of those “ghost cities” and other evidence of China’s fever of destruction, construction and abandonment.

Yahoo! Homes | Original Source

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The Chinese army just informed everyone that the internet means war

Business Insider By Linette Lopez | YAHOO! Finance | Original Source

pic(Reuters) The People’s Liberation Army isn’t joking around.

In a chilling memo released on Wednesday, the People’s Liberation Army, or PLA, informed the world that, at least on the internet, China is at war.

The memo is called “Cybersovereignty Symbolizes National Sovereignty.”

“The internet has become the main battlefront for struggle in the ideological area,” it said.

“With the existence of the network, the ideological front has been completely thrown open … National security has become an important component part of our country’s overall security ‘chessboard.’ It may be said that without cybersecurity, there is no national security.”

So what, exactly, does that mean?

It means there are enemies everywhere, and they come from Westerners creeping across borders through the net, polluting China with threatening ideas (emphasis added):

Western hostile forces and a small number of “ideological traitors” in our country use the network, and relying on computers, mobile phones and other such information terminals, maliciously attack our Party, blacken the leaders who founded the New China, vilify our heroes, and arouse mistaken thinking trends of historical nihilism, with the ultimate goal of using “universal values” to mislead us, using “constitutional democracy” to throw us into turmoil, use “colour revolutions” to overthrow us, use negative public opinion and rumours to oppose us, and use “de-partification and depoliticization of the military” to upset us.

And who likes being upset?

This comes at a time when the Chinese government pledged to make a “massive investment to improve Internet services,” according state media arm Xinhua News. The numbers are impressive: $70 billion committed to the internet for 2015, over $112 billion in 2016 and 2017. The money will improve broadband speeds and expand 4G access.

So process this for a second: If China expands the internet, it will be a HUGE internet, and naturally an internet of things, as we say.

The things that it will not have, though, are any “ideological traitors,” or anyone opposed to the Communist Party, or anyone applauding “universal values” and “constitutional democracy” — anything having to do with Western ideas.

To the PLA, this is open war. To the Communist Party, it follows the ideological framework of its new face — Xi Jinping.

pic(Ng Han Guan/AP) Chinese President Xi Jinping.

Since he took office in 2012, Xi has been trying to build a new sense of Chinese identity, one that sees all of modern life through the lens of nationalistic “Chinese characteristics.” That goes from things like capitalism to, of course, the internet.

Collectively, these two contradictory headlines — the PLA’s war and the expansion of the internet — fall into this framework, and serve as a blueprint for the way the Chinese will understand and use the internet for as long as President Xi is in power (that’s looking like it could be a while).

Of course, this “war” isn’t new. It’s just a regular old idea war being fought on the internet, a new front. The PLA admits it, and points out that it was the West who taught China how to fight this way during the Cold War. Not just in the USSR either, in South America and in Northern Africa.

This is an online public opinion battle with glints and flashes of cold steel and numerous opportunities to make a kill. Back in the day, to tackle the Soviet Union, one method Western hostile forces adopted was online infiltration in the ideological area. Afterwards, in the Southern Alliance, and a number of countries in Southwest Asia, and North Africa, they played the same tricks…

If hearts are won, there is gladness, if hearts are lost, there is failure. A regime’s disintegration often begins in the ideological area, political upheaval and regime change can happen in the space of a night, but ideological evolution is a long-term process. If the ideological front is broken, other fronts will become difficult to hold.

We’re assuming the PLA believes this goes both ways. That Western ideas could break them, and perhaps vice versa.

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The China Bubble That Wasn’t

Kenneth Rapoza Contributor | Forbes | Original Source

The world wanted China to go capitalist, did it not? Well, welcome to capitalism, people.  When a country as powerful and as large as China is allowing for its investor class to ship money out of country, and is allowing foreigners to ship money into its stock market for the first time ever, this is what is going to happen. Asset prices are going to go crazy for a little while.

A handful of companies have taken a hit recently, becoming unwilling examples of the China Bubble — as if China is the only country to ever have a bubble. Better yet, in the West, the narrative is that China is just not allowed to have a bubble. It can open its market, but asset prices can never inflate.

I’m going to go out on a limb here: China knows what it is doing. It might take a few years to see this, but they do.

Three things are happening to Chinese equity markets that are worth putting into perspective. One, the market is opening up to the rest of the world. Foreign investors can now buy Chinese A-shares for the first time. It’s currently on a quota system so as not to overburden the markets.  There will be no opening of the flood gates.  Instead, it will be more of a constant chisel chipping away at the dam until the water flows through naturally.

picSee this lady here? She and her friends in Shanghai are driving up the value of Hong Kong stocks.  Oddly, Westerners always wanted China to break down its walls and open its market. When it does, it gets blamed for creating a bubble as if it is the only economy ever to have such a thing. (Photo by JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)

This year’s creation of the Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect allowed foreign firms with Hong Kong broker/dealers to tap into the mainland A-shares market for the first time. It had some issues at first that needed to be worked out, such as settlement dates. And for the most part, global fund managers at places like State Street Bank, HSBC, Guinness Atkinson and Ashmore Group, to name a few, all told FORBES that they were cautiously optimistic about the so-called thru-train. They all said this would inevitably drive demand into mainland Chinese equities by American and European institutional investors.

The China-haters, which are in no short supply, all called the thru-train a failure within its first month of operation.

Although the Deutsche X-Trackers CSI China A-Shares (ASHR) exchange traded fund doesn’t measure the precise northbound flow into mainland Chinese equities via the thru-train, here is how the ETF has done this year as a result of this new and growing market.

ASHR3The majority in the financial media are focused on Hong Kong’s recent equity boom as if it is an example of the China Bubble expanding south of the border. The bigger story has been the A-shares, helped along by the People’s Bank of China’s mini-QE.

Just as Hong Kong brokers can now bring Americans and other foreign investors into mainland China via Shanghai, so can Chinese investors now invest in Hong Kong instead of Shanghai or a condo in a ghost city in Nanjing.

This is what happens when a million Chinese, who have been getting richer over the last 20 years, are finally given an option to invest outside of the mainland.

ASHR3The iShares MSCI Hong Kong ETF is up over 19% year to date. Other QE induced equity markets have done better at the outset of central bank asset buying. China also has another caveat: its mainland investor class, mostly all short term casino gambling equity players, now have access to Hong Kong listed shares for the first time.

Lastly, and just as important, there is this little institution in Beijing called the People’s Bank of China. It has about $4 trillion in cash, and a lot of room to move when it comes to stimulating the economy. China GDP is slowing as Beijing moves tortoise-like from its export-driven model to a more entrepreneurial economy focused on local consumers.

Unfortunately, the local consumer has failed to pick up the slack in export manufacturing and big banks are not lending like they used to. So the PBoC is providing the economy with some monetary stimulus. Some of that money will inevitably flow into equities.

“China is becoming one of those central bank markets — wherever there is an active central bank, you buy,” says Krishna Memani, CIO of OppenheimerFunds in New York. “All indicators are that the PBoC may get even more active.”

If Memani is right, we all know where the market is heading.

This is what happened to the S&P 500 after it bottomed in early March 2009 and the Fed was three months into its first round of quantitative easing.

ASHR3Using the same five month time line as EWH and ASHR, State Street’s SPDR S&P 500 ETF was more jacked up on QE and investor appetite than anything we are currently seeing in China. If there is a bubble in China, then there is a bubble in SPY and in the iShares MSCI Europe (VGK).

The general talking heads on CBNC celebrated the S&P’s meteoric Fed-induced high. But on China, the recent gains are somehow a complete mystery; a dark cloud waiting to rain on grandma’s 401k parade.

There are roughly 4,000 companies listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. But instead, the panic of late — reported on by Bloomberg — is around just three extremely rich firms who have lost over a third of their market cap in a single trading session. One is Hanergy Film, a solar panel equipment maker whose stock soared in April, then declined one day in May. Rumor has it that this was an insider pump and dump.

Year to date, Hanergy is still up over 40%, which means its market cap is still higher now than it was last year.

Moreover, anyone who has every followed Hanergy price movements knows this volatility is not new. On Oct. 2, the stock was worth $4.40 (Hong Kong dollars) per share only to fall to $0.96 four weeks later.

Goldfin Financial fell off a cliff on May 21. It has been flat-lined since. Still, that stock is up 117.4% so far this year. Yes, it lost market cap, as the alarm-ringing headlines showed. But the company’s market cap doubled this year already.

Then there’s Goldfin’s housing developer, Goldfin Properties, run by billionaire Pan Sutong. It also fell on May 21. Sutong told Bloomberg that he didn’t know what was behind the demand for his company’s stock of late.

“I don’t know why, I didn’t buy any,” 52-year-old Pan told Bloomberg on May 12. “I know the market is buying, but I don’t know who specifically.”

If he doesn’t know he, he is either not telling the truth, or the flow is from a few thousand Chinese short-termers who buy stocks like they play Sic Bo at the Sands in Macau.

That particular stock is up 217.9% year-to-date. Their one day loss, looked at over a longer term, is minuscule compared to how much their equity values have ballooned in 2015.

The thru-train is getting a new route: Shenzhen will join later this year.

In July, the MSCI index will likely include the A-Shares in its MSCI Emerging Markets Index, meaning any fund investing in that index, such as the massive iShares MSCI Emerging Markets (EEM) and Vanguard Emerging Markets (VWO) ETFs, will have to rebalance to reflect the change. That will mean more money coming into China A-shares. The market will only allow so much in at first, but it’s a big market and it will gradually get bigger as Beijing slowly expands its quota. For now, the trickle is significant. Everyone knows where this is heading.

“We haven’t been big players in the A-shares yet,” says Memani. “If we see an opportunity to use that channel we have everything set up to use it. When that process started, the expectation was that a large number of foreign investors would buy A shares. Instead, the movement we are seeing most is mainlanders buying H-shares,” he says of the Hong Kong listed equities.

Trillions of dollars have poured into the mainland over the years looking for much higher returns than they were getting in Hong Kong. Now that the return on investment is slowing, especially on the export-focused firms, individual businessmen from China and Hong Kong want to get their money out of the mainland. It is not easy to get money out of China through official channels. The thru-train is the easiest way.

There is a case to be made that Chinese are diversifying away from their home market and Hong Kong is one way out. But that is only part of the truth.

On the investor side of the equation, it is clear that Chinese locals are going ga-ga for the Hang Seng. It’s up 19.2% this year. Some dare call it a bubble. It’s probably not. These upticks are temporary.

“The investment channels in China are very limited,” says Grant Engelbart, a fund manager for CLS Investments in Omaha. The firm manages $6.5 billion in private accounts.

“If you’re Chinese and don’t want to buy real estate, and are already invested in Shanghai and Shenzhen, Hong Kong just makes simple sense. Of course there are a lot of new accounts opening, a lot of margin buying and that is worrisome because it drives up demand. But if Chinese investors are purchasing their own markets..is that so bad?” he asks, quickly coming back with the answer during a phone interview last week.

“No, it’s not so bad. And it’s not worrying to me. The quick and abrupt movement in price needs to settle down a little bit and will. The government isn’t too happy about retailers buying on margin, but I think the market doesn’t always remember that Beijing can control their economy and its citizens. The U.S. stock market is more institutional than China’s. Once institutional investors take more control of the volume, China’s equity market will become more stable,” he says.

This is still many years away yet. China’s gradual opening of its securities markets is in its early innings.

Retail investor dominate the A-shares and are now piling into the H-shares. Some companies took a hit, but most are not as dramatic.  The $9 billion Tsingtao Brewery is down 4.5% year-to-date.  The $3 billion developer SOHO China Ltd is up just 2.2%. The Hang Seng’s overall 19% rise is not indicative of a bubble, even if everyone in New York is busy looking for one.

In early May, the narrative was that the 5% sell-off in the Shanghai Composite meant the bubble was popping.   You could almost read “toldya so” written between the lines of most articles and commentary in Bloomberg and CNBC.

Waiting for a bubble to pop in China is like waiting for the Second Coming of Christ. It might be worth it when it happens and you’re first on the scene. But if it doesn’t show up for another 20 or 100 years, you’ll probably be dead by then anyway.

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Caught on camera: Russian waitress fights off customer after he gropes her [ Дaлa oтпoр наглoму пoсетителю oфициантка из Кaзaни Вoпросы пo тeл. 89370095413 ]

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Stayin’ sexy, not sawft.

pokkgb

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Guillermo Rigondeaux “El Chacal” Greatest Defensive Tribute 2015 in HD

One of the greatest defensive fighters of our time now has a tribute that does him justice. Watch this 2015 tribute in HD including highlights of Rigondeaux vs Amagasa. Entirely produced and edited by Boxing’s Finest.

Make sure to visit my facebook page by clicking the link below:
https://www.facebook.com/boxingnewsbo…

“audiomachine-Slipstream”, sound recording administered by:
Audiomachine
Audiomachine

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China’s “ghost cities”: a fever of destruction, construction, and abandonment [25/29]

Ghost City In Yunnan

A man walks along a street on November 20, 2013 in Chenggong, Yunnan Province of China. Chenggong is a satellite city located just south of Kunming. As of 2012, much of the newly constructed housing in Chenggong is still unoccupied, and it is reportedly one of the largest ghost towns in Asia. According to a China Youth Daily report in July, at least 12 such ghost cities across the country have been found. Besides the best known of these – Ordos in North China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, the list also included Changzhou in Jiangsu, Zhengdong New Area in Henan Province, Shiyan in Hubei and Chenggong District of Kunming in Yunnan.  (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)

***

Overzealous construction in China has left the country with a large number of empty developments clinging to the outskirts of major cities — a problem that some real estate developers have sought to solve with a bizarre side industry in the rental of Westerners to glamorize the areas and attract visitors. Click here for a short video report on the rent-a-foreigner industry, and click through this slideshow to see some of those “ghost cities” and other evidence of China’s fever of destruction, construction and abandonment.

Yahoo! Homes | Original Source

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Haunting World War II Photos of Paris, Then and Now

| YAHOO! News | Original Source

picOne Paris-based artist decided to dive into the romantic city’s history, painstakingly recreating some of the most haunting photos from World War II.

“I’m interested in Paris history and in the story of these few days in August 1944,” Julien Knez wrote to ABC News of the when the Liberation of Paris was fought, which eventually freed Paris from Nazi control.

picKnez spent one month searching for old photos of famous Paris landmarks taken during the city’s uprising, then spent another month retracing those photos’ footsteps, recreating each image to capture how much the city has changed in the past 71 years.

pic“It was a pretty moving experience, a sort of awareness of this historic event,” he wrote on his website describing the passion project. “Imagine the courage of these men and women of all ages, everyone earned by this infinite thirst for freedom finally at hand.”

picThe 50 photos serve as a time capsule of Parisian history, beautifully capturing how far the city has come.

pic“My favorite photo is the one on Hotel de Ville with 2 comrades who are found after street fights,” Knez explained. “A beautiful picture, the faces of deliverance.”

picTake a look at Knez’s tribute to his beloved city.

pic pic2 pic3 pic4

 

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The Last of Us [Penny Dreadful, Pound Foolish]

Penny Dreadful—the title refers to the penny dreadfuls, a type of 19th-century cheap British fiction publication with lurid and sensational subject matter. The TV series draws upon many characters from 19th-century Irish and British fiction, including Dorian Gray from Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, Mina Harker and Abraham Van Helsing from Bram Stoker’s Dracula, and Victor Frankenstein and his monster from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.

 

Mondo stands up, turns around, and faces her ridiculer. She’s sporting a wide Cheshire cat’s grin on her large, ugly mouth. The Lost Girl delivers a mocking dig meant to mortally wound. Why waste time merely drawing blood, when you can gut the bugger from the git go.

“Haters gonna hate. You’re letting personal feelings cloud your judgement. An amateur mistake on your part. Not a professional’s misstep. Not at the elite level. It borders on the asinine. And you a Doll, and to rub salt in the wound, you’re also a team lead. Makes me wonder who you slept with to get your position.”

Mondo gaps her legs as if to say: you fucked your way to the top.

“Junkie whore! You dare question my moral fortitude!”

“I do.”

Doll Katie starts to do something, but thinks better of it. She’ll pick the place and the time, and it won’t be in front of her boss in her boss’ office.

“I earned my position through merit. The exchange of sexual favors had nothing to do with it.”

“These two come up with a scheme to do away with me, and get away with it, with none the wiser. And it’s a fucking Dusey (as in Duesenberg). My hat’s off to them. I couldn’t have cooked up a better one myself. I mean I’m a known, full tilt, hardcore junkie. People like me go missing every day. Plausible deniability and no chance of repercussions. But, you hate me so much, that you couldn’t let go of doing something final instead that overtly reeks of wrongdoing. Question: have you met me before today?”

“I’ve seen your brief.”

“That’s not what I asked.”

“No, I have never met you before.”

“Yet you have an axe to grind. As if we were nemesis for a coon’s age. This from someone purported to be an elite-level pro. I use the descriptor purported in reference to you, because I’ve yet to see any evidence to prove that you are an elite-level pro. Like I said before. It borders on the asinine. An amateur move that I’d bet bespeaks of a strictly amateur moveset. So far, that’s how you represent.”

“I won’t be mocked like this, least of all by someone of your despicable ilk! Depraved sader!”

Seeing that her Doll will not let this bone go, Pope Ruth puts a stop to the heated exchange.

“Enough, Sister Katherine. Take Miss Kane down the hall to your ready room. I have things to discuss with Coco.”

“Yes, your Grace.”

They leave the Papacy and walk down the hallway to the ready room. Stenciled in gold letters upon its ornate hand-carved mahogany door is Office of Internal Governance (OIG). Sister Katherine’s official title in the Church is manager of Compliance Risk Management. The colloquial translation of that being Doll team leader. A senior Doll, she has led the Church-wide Compliance Risk Management Board and managed collaboration across the Interfaith Alliance and Catholic-Episcopal Intra-Faith Dialogue to identify current and trending compliance risks and to ensure that integrated mitigation plans were in place.

So much hate for this girl. The nun is fuming. Consumed by hate. Despising the girl with every fiber of her being. Not matter that the Vampire would like it, Sister Katherine would love to flay this demon to death, over and over again, without relent. Flay the bitch to death. Let the bitch resurrect. Flay the bitch to death. Let the bitch resurrect. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat.

Sister Kathrine opens the door and politely gestures for the harlot to enter. Mondo crosses the threshold. The room is Spartan. No-nonsense. A group of Dolls man an assortment of desks. They look up briefly from their religious texts and virtual flat-screen monitors. From the expressions on their faces, they know who she is, have studied her brief, and they too despise her.

“As you can see, whore, there is no love for you here.”

Sister closes the door, but she does not lock it.

“Lock the door, please.” Then Mondo says something to raise every nun’s eyebrow in the room. “So that it can be just us girls.”

Doll Katie does as Mondo asks. There is a pillory standing in the center of an interrogation room that’s confluent with the ready room. Shackles are bolted to the floor. Two large hooks with thumb screws are mounted in the ceiling above them. An assortment of barber straps and flails hang from pegs set in the walls. Blood-stained ceramic tiles line its walls, floor, and ceiling. No amount of thorough cleaning with the most abrasive cleaner-bleach [e.g. Comet or Ajax] can remove the blood. It’s ingrained in the tiles from centuries of torture.

They walk out of the ready room and into the interrogation room. The Church calls it a cleansing room. A place where a sinner can be cleansed of their sins or die trying.

Doll Katie turns on the confessional recorder. It records video and audio for the official record.

“So there is no misunderstanding. You’re asking us to punish you for your sins?”

“Complete absolution. It’s on your watch. The buck stops with you. You decide. You deal with the repercussions.”

“And if I choose to destroy you in the end?”

“Like I said, it’s on your dime.”

“Everybody in the ready room gets a whack at you?”

“To their heart’s content, but you take all the blame.”

“Agreed. You shall be punished, harlot. And if we don’t get satisfaction, we will destroy you.”

The Dolls in the ready room stop what they’re doing and join in on the cleansing. Mondo lets her hair down. She is stripped of everything, including her perls. A ball-gag is fitted in her mouth; its straps tightly bind her head. She is hoisted up and her thumbs locked in the thumb restraints of the ceiling hooks. The cuffs of the leg irons bolted to the floor are locked around her ankles. She’s stretched between floor and ceiling as if she were cuffed to a vertical rack. Then the beatings commence. Barber straps and flails are used by the vindictive nuns to assault the girl’s back, legs, arms, torso, and face. No part of her is spared.

Flay the bitch to death. Let the bitch resurrect. Flay the bitch to death. Let the bitch resurrect. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat. In the end, they do not destroy her. The bloody pulp that remains is locked in the pillory.

 

 

 

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Dr Zimmerman’s Tuesday Tip — The 4-Letter Word That Overcomes Failure

NEXTNo matter how hard you try, you will make some mistakes in life.  That’s a given.

When you make a mistake, there are three things you can do. One, you can resolve to never make another mistake, which is fine, but impractical.  Two, you can refuse to take any more risks that might not work out, which is foolish.

Of course, I advocate a third option.  It’s the option that all true leaders and truly successful people take.  When a day has gone badly or a piece of work has fallen apart, they…

1. Focus on a four-letter word.

Brace yourself, because you may be shocked to see me use this dirty, four-letter word. But here goes…

The dirty four-letter word is, “NEXT.” When a project fails or a mistake happens, successful people just say, “next.”

Suppose you were a doctor.  If you stuck your head into the waiting room, called a sick patient into your examination room, but a few minutes later the patient died, what would you do?  Would you take the rest of the day off because it wasn’t going very well?  Would you quit?

No!  If you were a doctor, you would simply open the door to the waiting room and say “NEXT.”

Of course, if you were devoted to the pursuit of excellence and the achievement of your goals, you would go several steps beyond the use of this four-letter word.  You can read all about it in Chapter 7 of my new book, The Payoff Principle: Discover the 3 Secrets for Getting What You Want out of Life and Work.

To get your copy of this amazing book, go to thepayoffprinciple.com.

For today’s purposes, however, to deal with mistakes and failures, you must also take a moment to…

2. Learn from your mistake.

You see, the only time you really fail is when you make a mistake and do not learn from it.

Handled appropriately, a mistake is merely feedback. You’re simply learning what not to do the next time around.  You’re shifting your focus from the past to the future.  And that is an almost certain path to success.

Arthur Gordon proved that.  As a businessman, Arthur made a lot of money climbing the ladder of success. But then he made a number of bad decisions, resulting in the loss of his wife, kids, health, and money. He bottomed out. He became so depressed that he contemplated suicide.

Before he took such a drastic action, however, Arthur decided to seek the consultation of the greatest psychiatrist in the United States. The psychiatrist was a well-respected, eighty-year-old fellow, who still maintained his practice.

Arthur talked about all of his problems. He told the psychiatrist about his bad decisions, his poor judgments, and the loss of his family and funds. Arthur went on for about fifteen minutes, explaining why life wasn’t worth living anymore.

All of a sudden the old psychiatrist said, “That’s enough. In the last fifteen minutes you’ve said the same phrase over and over again, and as long as you keep saying that phrase you will never get better. You keep using the two saddest words in the English language.

Arthur was curious. He wondered what the old psychiatrist meant.

The psychiatrist went on. Those two words are “If only.” He said, “You’d be amazed if you knew how many years I’ve sat in this chair and listened to thousands of people use those two words. They go on and on, starting all their sentences using those two words, until I finally stop them. I say to them, ‘if only’ you would stop saying ‘if only,’ we might be able to get somewhere.

What’s the answer?” Arthur wanted to know. “What do you do?

The psychiatrist said very simply, “You strike those two words from your vocabulary. And you substitute the two most powerful, positive words in the English language. You say ‘next time.’ This phrase faces you in the right direction, pulls you forward, and gives you lift instead of drag.

This psychiatrist’s advice wasn’t deep, complex, or theoretical. It was as simple as taking the time to learn from your failure — and then focus on the “next time.

Positive thinkers and winners do this all the time. They view every failure as a chance to learn. They believe that growth and learning can come from any situation, experience, problem, or crisis. So they’re not deflated by the failures that come their way.

Could the same thing be said about you? Do you squeeze the learnings out of your failures? Do you then focus on the “next times” of the future? Or do you dwell on the “if onlys” of the past?

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